Solo Lady Travels: Niagara Falls Edition

Jessica Peterson

Niagara Falls aerial view, Ontario, Canada

Solo lady travelers can all attest: Niagara Falls is hardly the most worrisome place on the planet for a girl by herself. Even so, Niagara Falls requires some planning for solo travelers. On the one hand, Niagara Falls is a natural wonder, which means it should be on everyone’s bucket list. On the other hand, Niagara Falls has long been billed as a destination for loved-up couples and families, so much of the materials you might read for travel inspiration simply don’t apply to you on your own.

If you want to visit Niagara Falls on your lonesome, you don’t need to worry about the proper form of attire, means of protecting yourself and other issues that might plague a single lady elsewhere in the world. Instead, you do need to think about how you’ll fill your days. Here are a few of our best ideas to help you plan your solo lady Niagara Falls adventure.

How Much Time Will You Stay?

Horseshoe Falls at Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada

Niagara Falls is a place that is as fun to visit for a weekend as it is to explore for an entire month. There is so much history and excitement in the city and the surrounding areas that you could move to Niagara and never stop finding new things to do.

However, Niagara Falls is best experienced during a three to four–day trip. With that amount of time, you will be able to see the falls in all its glory, explore the Niagara Gorge, visit the Niagara Valley and engage with a few other top attractions, and you will leave excited for your next visit to Niagara Falls.

Niagara’s best season for travel is in late spring and early summer: May through July. However, this is also when the bulk of Niagara’s visitors flock to the region. If you thrive by sinking into a crowd, you might as well take advantage of the gorgeous weather during this time. However, you can cut costs and see a side of Niagara few get to experience by planning your trip for fall, when the trees change color, or winter, when there’s a chance the falls could freeze over. There is hardly a bad time to visit Niagara Falls, so whenever you have a break in your solo adventure, you should plan a trip.

Where Will You Devote Your Budget?

Skylon Tower at Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada

Rarely do solo female travelers identify as luxury travelers. It’s likely that you have a strict (and low) budget for your adventures and visiting a developed tourist destination like Niagara Falls might make you nervous for your bank account. Fortunately, Niagara Falls is much more budget-friendly than you might expect. Plenty of attractions are free — especially those concerning the falls themselves — which means you have more money to devote to aspects of your trip like accommodation and transportation.

Indeed, it is well worthwhile to splurge on your lodgings; most hostels in this area cost nearly as much as a hotel room, and you definitely won’t have deluxe amenities like buffet breakfast or a bathroom to yourself. Hotels near Niagara Falls, on the Canada side, boast outstanding views of the falls as well as some noteworthy perks, so they are worth the extra portion of your budget.

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Additionally, you should invest in a pass for the WEGO transportation system. These buses travel to and from the most common areas of the city and countryside, including a variety of Niagara Parks, Clifton Hill, Lundy’s Lane and more. A two-day, unlimited-ride pass will cost you about $14.00, which is much less than you would spend on rideshares or a rental car.

What Will You Do by Yourself?

Horseshoe Falls at Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada

This is the big question, and there is just one good answer that suits every solo lady traveler’s needs and interests: Whatever you want. Obviously, your trip should be guided primarily by what you find interesting in the area. While guides for families might highlight attractions like the Great Canadian Midway (an arcade with over 300 games) or the IMAX experience “Miracles, Myths & Magic” (as well as the Daredevil Exhibit in the lobby), you don’t have to contend with kids’ tastes — or anyone’s opinions, for that matter.

Still, if you’d like some direction, here’s a rough itinerary ideal for solo travelers:

Day One: This day should be devoted to all things waterfall. You should visit Queen Victoria Park, Table Rock, Rainbow Bridge and Goat’s Island for the best free views, but you can pay for even more outstanding views at Skylon Tower, the Niagara SkyWheel or a Niagara River cruise.

Day Two: Once you’ve seen the falls, you can explore the surrounds. Cut costs by dedicating your day to more free attractions, like Dufferin Islands and the Botanical Gardens.

Day Three: Venture outside Niagara Falls proper by heading toward wine country, the Niagara Valley. Niagara-on-the-Lake is the quintessential small town, and it boasts outstanding live theater for much of the year. You can also visit towns like St. Catharines and Grimsby, which boast interesting history and cute shopping areas.

Day Four: This is your day to relax and indulge. You might book a spa appointment at Christienne Fallsview Spa, where you can soak out all the travel stress and re-energize for your next trip. You can also sample wines on a winery tour. At the very least, you should have a final Niagara hurrah with an upscale meal at AG or Tide & Vine.

Niagara Falls makes for a quick, affordable trip — especially if you are going solo. Take control of your travels and enjoy Niagara your way on a lady trip of your own this year.

Jessica Peterson
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Jessica Peterson

Jessica Peterson is a travel filmmaker, photographer, and journalist. She released her first documentary film about indigenous culture on Guam in 2016, after having lived nearly 7 years on the Pacific island.
Jessica Peterson
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